The main class project constitutes the development of an administrative report/portfolio, which outlines the origins, mission statement, and general history of a given public organization and provides an overall assessment of such organization. The overall assessment will focus on the exploration and examination of an organization’s current agenda, its interaction with political actors, what the organization aims to produce through public policy making, and, most importantly, how the organization may best be managed to maximize policy performance for serving the public concerning a certain policy problem. The project is worth 15% of the final grade and should be 5–6 pages (approximately 1,500 words) in length (including references), with size 12 Times New Roman font, 1–inch margins, and a double–spaced format.
Note 1: Your final literature list should consist of at least 5 scholarly references and you may use the references listed in the syllabus as a starting point (do not attempt to cite a laundry list of encyclopedia–type references). You are required to carefully read the document I provide on citation and reference requirements and employ these formatting rules for your research paper and other written assignments.
Note 2: When you turn in your paper, make sure that it is in Word format with a “.doc” or “.docx” ending (i.e., Windows 1997–2003 or Windows 2007+ compatible) in order to avoid technical issues.
********This was her feedback from my topic on Health and Human Services******
I had provided my feedback to all the students on April 8. I am not sure why you did not receive it. Here is the response-
Your topic looks interesting. It is good that you are focusing on certain policy problems but please remember to outline the origins, mission statement, and general history of your chosen public organization and provide an overall assessment of such organization as well. The overall assessment will focus on the exploration and examination of an organization’s current agenda, its interaction with political actors, what the organization aims to produce through public policy making.
As mentioned before, your reference list should include variety of sources such as print articles (newspapers, news magazines) books, journals and not mostly web sources.
***WRITING THE PAPER (DUE WEEK 6–A VIA EMAIL BY 11PM MT)***
***NOTE: When writing your paper, be sure to have the cover page and, in the subsequent pages, please also be sure to have each of the sections detailed below clearly labeled with a bold subheading (i.e., Abstract, Organizational Entity Outline and Overview, Findings and Discussion, Conclusion, and References).
Name/Title –
Provide your name and a title for your paper (cover page).
Abstract – Provide a single paragraph (100–250 words) that summarizes your paper. The first sentence should introduce the topic and why it is important to consider. Next, state the public organization (and relevant policy area) that you explore and the policy problem you address. Then summarize the evidence you gathered for observation and examination of your topic. If applicable, report your analytical findings and provide a conclusion, taking special care to explain your contribution to scholarly knowledge on the subject.
______ (10 points)
 
Organizational Entity Outline and Overview – Using scholarly resources, provide a literature review that puts into historical context the public organization you are researching. Outline the origins, mission statement, and general history of that given organization and provide an overall descriptive assessment of how such an agency has influenced performance outputs and outcomes related to a particular policy sphere. The overall assessment will focus on the exploration and examination of the organization’s current agenda, its interaction with political actors, and what the organization produces (i.e., outputs and outcomes as measures of performance). In doing so, provide an overview of the policy problem/issue you are interested in and what you generally believe could be done to improve the organization’s handling of the specific policy problem/issue.
______ (40 points)
 
Findings and Discussion – Provide a detailed assessment of what you found when examining your evidence (supplementary tables and/or figures are welcome but not absolutely necessary). Then provide a thorough amount of discussion over your findings – how they relate to the general literature and to your initial expectations. More importantly, you must also detail your contribution in light of your findings. However, if you do not find what you expected, that is okay – your contribution becomes the unexpected findings and their implications.
_____ (25 points)
 
Conclusion – Provide a summary conclusion that restates your original topic, arguments, findings, and, of course, concluding thoughts. You should also add some thoughts on the limitations you faced in trying to examine your topic and how future studies might take the next step to develop a better understanding of the relationships you addressed.
_____ (10 points)
 
References –Your list of minimum five or more literature/reference sources from variety of sources including newspapers, news-magazines, books, journals, internet etc. Personal interviews are welcome.
_____ (5 points)
 
_____ (Total Points)
 
Reference Rules
All papers and take home exams submitted in this class must follow the Style Manual for Political Science, (1993) published by the American Political Science
Association (APSA). If you are following APSA format, use in-text citations within your text to indicate the source of borrowed ideas and quotations. At the end of your paper you must provide a list of all of the references cited in your paper.
Sources for more information on writing
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
http://www.english.uiuc.edu/cws/wworkshop/
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Writing/

When do you need to cite?

According to the APSA rules, you must include parenthetical (in-text) citations within your paper in order to indicate the source of a quotation or any information included in your paper that is not your own. This includes:

  • Direct quotes
    • Direct quotes should be used sparingly and kept short
    • Unless there is something particularly special about the language of the direct quote it is better to paraphrase.
  • Paraphrases of information
  • General ideas

The citation appears in parentheses right after the direct quotes, paraphrase or information.
There must be a corresponding entry in the Reference section for each work cited in the body of the paper
An in-text citation without a full reference in the Reference / Works Cited section does not constitute a fully cited source.

Direct Quotes

Direct quotes (word for word from another source) must be surrounded by quotation marks. The author’s last name, the year of publication and page numbers follow in parentheses directly after. The format is the same for books and newspaper and journal articles. The punctuation for the sentence follows the parentheses.
Example:
“Political scientists develop theories or frameworks both to understand the causes of events that occur in international relation” (Mingst 2004, 3).

Indirect Quotes

If you use someone else’s ideas and put them in your own words you must give that person proper credit. At the end of the sentence you must supply the original author’s name and the year of the work’s publication. Or, you can incorporate the author’s name into your writing.
Here is a direct quote from Mingst:
“Realists and radicals do not recognize the importance of individuals as independent actors in international relations” (Mingst 2004, 155).
If you were to put this in your own words you would still have to cite the source properly.
Realists and radicals do not consider individuals as independent actors in international relations (Mingst, 2004: 155).
Or:
According to Mingst (2004: 155), realists and radicals do not consider individuals as independent actors in international relations.
If you are using a single source for a complete paragraph or idea, indicate this at the beginning of the paragraph:
Mingst (2004) considers realism to have influenced much of US Cold War foreign policy. In particular she points to…
Or:
According to Mingst, realism has influenced much of US Cold War foreign policy. In particular she points to three factors First…. Second … Finally… (2004, 155).
If the material you are drawing on is mentioned in many parts of the book or article, a page number is not required.

String Citing

String citing, that is stringing together a whole lot of direct quotes and using your own words just to link them together is not acceptable. Direct quotes should only be used when the quote is particularly relevant to an idea or position put forward by the author. Direct quotes of factual information are not appropriate and Suggest that you do not have a clear grasp of the material. As a general rule direct quotes should not exceed one or two sentences in length

*String citing makes a paper impossible to grade as there is not enough of the student’s own work to assess

How Should You Cite?
This in-text citation format applies to all types of sources – print or online.
** Page numbers can also be omitted where they do not exist; for example with some web sources.
Citing multiple authors and works
Citing government documents
Reference / Works Cited Section
Article from a Journal, Single Author

  1. Author’s name, last name first
  2. Year of publication
  3. Title of article (in quotation marks)
  4. Name of Journal (in italics)
  5. Volume number
  6. Issue number, or month (in parentheses)
  7. Page numbers of entire article

Jentleson, Bruce. 1992. “The Pretty Prudent Public: Post Post-Vietnam American Opinion on the Use of Military Force.” International Studies Quarterly 36 (2): 49- 74.
Article from a Journal, More than one author

  1. First author’s name, last name first, followed by second author’s name, first name first (and any other authors after that)
  2. Year of publication
  3. Title of article (in quotation marks)
  4. Name of Journal (in italics)
  5. Volume number
  6. Issue number, or month (in parentheses)
  7. Page numbers of entire article

Fearon, James D., and David Laitin. 2003. “Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War.” American Political Science Review 97 (1): 75-90.
Friedrich, J., P. Barnes, K. Chapin, I. Dawson, V. Garst, and D. Kerr. 1999. “Psychophysical Numbing: When Lives are Valued Less as the Lives at Risk Increase.” Journal of Consumer Psychology 8 (3): 277-299.
Article from a Magazine

  1. Author’s name, last name first
  2. If multiple authors follow format for multiple author journal articles
  3. Year of publication
  4. Title of article (in quotation marks)
  5. Name of magazine (in italics)
  6. Month of publication
  7. Page numbers of entire article

Rohter, Larry. 2007. “A Huge Amazon Monster Is Only a Myth. Or Is It?” New York Times, July 8, 2007.
Class lecture

  1. Author’s (professor’s) name, last name first
  2. Year of publication (year class was held).
  3. Lecture number and title (in italics)
  4. Title of class
  5. University at which class was held, semester class taken

Bragg, Belinda, 2008. “Lecture 10: Alliances and Deterrence.” Introduction to World Politics, Texas A&M University, Summer 2008.
Book, Single Author

  1. Author’s name, last name first
  2. Year of publication
  3. Title of book (in italics)
  4. City and state of publication
  5. Name of publisher

Gurr, Ted Robert. 1971. Why Men Rebel. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
Book, More than one author

  1. First author’s name, last name first, followed by second author’s name, first name first (and any other authors after that)
  2. Year of publication
  3. Title of book (in italics)
  4. City and state of publication
  5. Name of publisher

Snyder, Glenn H., and Paul Diesing. 1977. Conflict Among Nations: Bargaining, Decision Making, and System Structure in International Crises. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
Secondary source

  1. Name of original author, last name first
  2. Follow reference format that corresponds to type of publication of original source (book, journal article, etc.)
  3. “Quoted in” followed by full reference for secondary source

Wilson, Graham and Anthony Barker. 1997. “Whitehall’s Disobedient Servants? Senior Officials’ Potential Resistance to Ministers in British Government Departments.” British Journal of Political Science 27, No.2: 223-46. Quoted in Almond, Gabriel, G. Bingham Powell Jr., Kaare Strom and Russell J. Dalton. 2003. Comparative Politics Today: A World View, Seventh Edition. New York, NY: Longman.
Chapter in an edited volume

  1. Name of chapter author, last name first
  2. Year of publication
  3. Title of chapter (in quotation marks)
  4. Title of book (in italics, preceded by “In”)
  5. Name of editor(s) of book (preceded by “eds.”)
  6. City and state of publication
  7. Name of publisher

Collier, Paul. 2000. “Doing Well out of War: An Economic Perspective.” In Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars, eds. M. Berdal and D. M. Malone. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers.
Aronson, E. and J. M. Carlson. 1968. “Experimentation in Social Psychology.” In The Handbook of Social Psychology, Volume 2. eds. G. Lindzey and E. Aronson. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley.
Government Statute

  1. Name of act
  2. Year of enactment
  3. Title of book (in italics)
  4. Volume and section
  5. Page number

Administrative Procedure Act. 1946. Statutes at Large. Vol. 60, sec. 10, p. 243.
Legal References

  1. Case name
  2. Citation
  3. Year the case was decided (in parentheses)

Mapp v. Ohio, 367, U.S. 643 (1961).
Government Hearing

  1. Name government branch
    1. If Congress, specify House or Senate
  2. Name of Committee holding hearing
  3. Year of Hearing
  4. Title of hearing (in italics)
  5. Session of Congress
  6. Date of Hearing

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign Relations. 1985. Famine in Africa. 99th Cong., 1st sess., 17 January.
Unpublished paper presented at a meeting

  1. Author’s name, last name first
  2. Year of presentation
  3. Title of article (in quotation marks)
  4. Name of organization (preceded by “Presented at the annual meeting of”)
  5. City and state (or country if international) where meeting was held
  6. Date of meeting

Shaykhutdinov, Renat and Belinda Bragg. 2007. “Do Grievances Matter? An Experimental Examination of the Greed versus Grievance Debate.” Presented at the Annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Portland, OR. July 5 – July 9.
Websites

  1. Author’s name, last name first
    1. All online material has an “author”. If no specific individual is listed as the author of the material you are using, then the sponsor of the website is the sponsor of the website. (for example, for the purposes of citation the “author” of this material is the Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University)
  2. Year of publication
    1. All online sources have a “date of publication”. If no specific posting date is listed, then the date is the date you last accessed the site.
      1. Posting dates often appear at the very bottom of a webpage
  3. Title of article (in quotation marks)
  4. Complete URL
  5. Last date on which article was accessed

Frontline, 2007. “Spying on the Home Front: Interview with John Yoo.” http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/homefront/interviews/yoo.html (July 8, 2007).
Reinhardt, Eric. 1996. “The Selection Effect of International Dispute Settlement Institutions.” http://polmeth.wustl.edu/workingpapers.php?text=conflict&searchauthors=T&searchtitle=T&searchkeywords=T&searchabstract=T&startdate=1995-01-01&enddate=2007-07-08&order=dateposted&submit=Search (July 8, 2007).
Central Intelligence Agency. 2007. “The World Factbook: Albania.” https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/al.html (July 8,2007).
NOTE: Print materials that are located online (such as the New York Times online, or an article from an academic journal found via JSTOR or another e-journal site) follow the reference format corresponding to their original form of publication not the website format
 
 
 
 

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